Cation

Definition - What does Cation mean?

The cation is often referred to as the cation exchange. They are positively charged cations. The cations give the soil the ability to react with positively charged ions. They have more protons than electrons.

The essential soil cations are ammonium, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. They are critical for any plant to grow and flourish. Additional soil cations include sodium, aluminum, and hydrogen.

The cation is derived from the Greek word 'kation' which translates 'to go down'.

MaximumYield explains Cation

Cations can also be divided into two categories, either acid or base. Abundant soil cations are beneficial for plants to grow and flourish.

Cations in the soil have the unique ability to react and positively charge molecules. Soil with abundant organic matter has high levels of cations. Sandy soil has decreased cation levels and is unable to exchange cations so often lacks any remote level of electrical charge.

Cations in the soil reveal how well soil can hold onto nutrients and water. Soils that have low cations require frequent watering. Adding water, worm composts, and other organic matter into the soil increases the soil’s cations.

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