Allium

Definition - What does Allium mean?

The term allium refers to a genus of monocotyledonous flowering plants, meaning they are plants whose seeds contain just one embryonic leaf (cotyledon).

In particular, the allium plant family includes both bulbing and non-bulbing plants. Garlic, onions, shallots, scallions, leeks, and chives are all a part of the allium family.

In addition to these culinary alliums, there are ornamental alliums like purple sensation, drumstick allium, yellow allium, and globemaster and gladiator alliums, which are said to be the tallest.

Allium is actually the Latin word for garlic.

MaximumYield explains Allium

There are more than 700 different types of alliums in the world.

Alliums all contain organosulfur compounds that have antioxidant properties, making them protective against certain health conditions such as heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure and cholesterol.

The concentration of organosulfur compounds in allium plants is due to the large quantities of sulphur that accumulate as the plant grows. Boosting levels of nitrogen and sulphur will increase the flavor and organosulfur compounds in the plant.

Alliums can be grown indoors or outdoors, in soil and in hydroponics. Hydroponic alliums generally grow well on a standard vegetative formulation. Alliums can also grow in many different types of soil, as long as it is well-drained, as alliums prefer almost drought-like conditions and direct sunlight.

Alliums are considered low-maintenance, easy to grow plants because they don't take up too much space and do not attract pests like deer or rabbits.

The best time to plant allium bulbs outdoors is in the fall. When the time comes, be ready with the bulbs in hand. Many growers prefer to order their bulbs in the mail. Once planted, ornamental alliums will multiply on their own year after year.


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