Tropical Plant

Definition - What does Tropical Plant mean?

A tropical plant is a plant that grows naturally in a tropical climate. A tropical climate is typically hot and humid, with temperatures constantly exceeding 18 degrees Celsius, with zero frost days.

In colder climates north of the equator, tropical plants can be grown as houseplants and set outside during the warm, sunny months. Commercially, tropical plants can be grown in colder climates, but they must be grown inside of greenhouses and with other forms of controlled environment agriculture.

The term tropical plant refers to any type of plant that naturally flourishes in an environment that resembles the Tropics, a region of the Earth surrounding the equator.

MaximumYield explains Tropical Plant

Tropical plants require consistently warmer temperatures and more humid environments than regular plants. Tropical plants also come in both blooming and foliage plants. Bromeliads, palms, and orchids are considered tropical plants.

Tropical plants are quite hardy, growing quite well as houseplants in more northern climates. However, they do require a little more care regarding humidity and moisture.

Contrary to what you might expect, most tropical plants do not do well in direct sunlight and should be located in shadier environments. Because many tropical plants naturally grow near the sea, many species of tropical plants can tolerate higher than average salt levels.

Tropical plants are great for growing in the greenhouse and thrive in the more humid conditions of the greenhouse. Orchids, bird of paradise, and bromeliad can all be grown commercially in a northern climate greenhouse.

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