Rain Garden

Definition - What does Rain Garden mean?

A rain garden is a garden planted in a hole or depression that receives its water from the rain runoff of buildings, roadways, sidewalks, or other nearby impervious structures. By giving rainwater a place to go, this kind of garden reduces erosion from rainwater runoff, and it significantly reduces (or eliminates) the need to water the plants on a regular basis.

MaximumYield explains Rain Garden

Building and planting a rain garden offers homeowners and business owners a sustainable means to reduce erosion and other issues caused by runoff on and around their properties with minimal effort and expense. By planting the garden in a low area and creating a hole or depression in that area, a natural place is created for runoff rainwater to gather and sink into the ground. By planting native plants and plants that thrive in the local environment (and are compatible with the soil pH), external watering needs are reduced. Instead, it will use up the wastewater that would otherwise have just been runoff.

In addition to providing an attractive solution to local runoff problems, rain gardens can have a significant positive impact on the local ecosystem. They have been shown to reduce the amount of pollution (silt, oil, etc.) collecting in streams and creeks in their area by as much as 30 per cent.

To improve this even more, those planting rain gardens should look into growing local and adopted plants that have deep root systems. This will enhance their drought tolerance, making it less likely that they will need watered during dry spells. It will also increase water filtration, further helping the local ecosystem.

When planting a rain garden, some good choices include wildflowers, rushes, ferns, and other vegetation that grows on the edges of wetlands. Larger shrubs and smaller trees are good choices too. Getting some variation in the depths of the root systems will help with soil permeability and water filtration.

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