Complete Flower

Definition - What does Complete Flower mean?

A complete flower is a plant biology term that is used to describe a flower that is built with four parts which include the sepals, petals, pistils and stamens. If any of these four parts, which are integral in forming a flower, is missing, a flower is called an incomplete flower. A complete flower has both the pistil and stamen, female and male reproductive parts respectively, and enables pollination.

MaximumYield explains Complete Flower

In order to understand a complete flower, it is important to understand the four parts that make it. Sepals are the outer layers that are green and leaf-like and it holds the flower together during the growing period. Petals are also an outer layer, that is colorful and leaf-like, and it is the part of the flower that attracts insects for pollination. Pistils, the female part of the flower, and stamens the male part of the flower are the third and fourth integral parts. These four organs put together make a complete flower.

A complete flower is found in only monoecious plants and not dioecious plants. A monoecious plant has flowers with both pistil and stamen on one plant, which can result in both complete and incomplete flowers. However, a dioecious plant can have either a pistil or stamen on one plant, which results in only incomplete flowers.

With both male and female reproductive parts in the same flower, a complete flower supports an easy pollination process. Wind and small insects are the two most efficient pollinators of a complete flower.

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