Seed Starting Fertilizer

Definition - What does Seed Starting Fertilizer mean?

Seed starting fertilizer is designed to help ensure strong seedlings and overall healthier plant growth. Most seed starting fertilizers have been formulated to provide stronger root development in seedlings. Often this formulation includes a range of additives, ranging from natural vitamins and minerals to synthetic inputs.

Seeds require less fertilizer than plants in the vegetative and flowering stages, so seed starting fertilizers help growers deliver the perfect amount of fertilization to their seedlings. Seed starting fertilizers contain lower levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium than general purpose fertilizers.

MaximumYield explains Seed Starting Fertilizer

In order for plants to develop healthy and strong, they need the right start. For those who choose to start their plants from seeds, that means taking the appropriate steps to ensure a good start. Using a seed starting fertilizer and soilless mix can help ensure strong root development, healthy growth, and more productive plants overall.

To be clear, you’ll need several items in addition to seed starting fertilizer to get started. You’ll need a container, such as a seed starting tray, as well as a way to gently water your seeds and seedlings. Finally, you’ll need a seed starting fertilizer or seed starting potting mix. Both products are pretty much the same, although the names are different.

With a seed starting potting mix, the fertilizer is already added to the mixture itself. Note that none of these products are actually made from soil. Instead, they include things like peat moss and perlite, combined with fertilizer and other organic elements that will breakdown and degrade over time.

The purpose of a seed starting fertilizer is to promote strong root growth, as well as an upright, straight stem in seedlings. The fertilizer mix should be able to hold sufficient moisture to support growth without retaining too much water. This can be aided by using a tray with perforations at the bottom to allow drainage.

You’ll find both commercial mixes and organic seed starting fertilizer mixtures on the market. Both work in the same way, but organic versions tend to use more natural ingredients than what you’ll find in conventional mixtures.

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