Soil Inoculant

Definition - What does Soil Inoculant mean?

Soil inoculants are tiny fungal filaments known as mycorrhizae that reside naturally in soil. They form a symbiotic relationship with plants and aid the roots of the plant in absorbing water and nutrients.

The soil inoculants also release enzymes that help the plant break down surrounding nutrients. The fungi use the plant’s discarded phosphorus and other nutrients to survive and reproduce.

MaximumYield explains Soil Inoculant

The bacteria rhizobia are also a soil inoculant and are highly beneficial for legumes. The bacteria fix atmospheric nitrogen into the soil for the plant and the plant releases carbon that it gains from photosynthesis for the bacteria to use for survival.

Over-cultivation, soil erosion, excessive chemical use, and soil compaction all decrease the presence of soil inoculants.

Soil inoculants can be added to soil or growing mediums and are widely available commercially. Commercial soil inoculants can be purchased as a powder, granular form, or liquid.

Follow the instructions on the label when adding them to the soil around a plant.

Adding soil inoculants during times of drought frequently increases the drought tolerance of the plant. In many plants, soil inoculants also help increase the plant’s disease resistance.

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