Bokashi Composting

Definition - What does Bokashi Composting mean?

Bokashi composting is an all-natural composting method that utilizes inoculated bran to naturally ferment items such as food scraps. The composted by-product is a safe soil builder that is loaded with nutrients to fertilize plants.

The Bokashi composting method relies on the isolation and culturing of certain strains of bacteria. The unique bacterial process was developed in 1982 by Dr. Teuro Higa, a professor at University of Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan.

Unlike other composting methods, even meat and dairy products are safely broken down using the Bokashi composting method. The entire process takes approximately 7-10 days, which makes it 10 times faster than traditional composting methods, and it also produces no noxious odors, heat, or greenhouse gasses.

MaximumYield explains Bokashi Composting

The Bokashi composting method consists of using a five-pound bin that is usually made of plastic. It features a tight-fitting lid and a spigot located near the base. The composting process relies on a special inoculated bran that is made up of beneficial microbes. The microbes flourish in an anaerobic, acidic environment. Unlike other composting methods, the Bokashi compost smells far less foul.

The Bokashi bran is commercially available in two-pound bags. All kitchen waste and other waste products are mixed with a handful of the Bokashi bran and placed in the plastic bin. The bran and the waste must be compressed to remove as much oxygen as possible to facilitate the breakdown process. Each day the liquid, must be siphoned off.

At the end of about 10 days, the entire contents of the bin should be entirely composted. It can then be used directly in the garden or greenhouse.

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