Powder Coated

Definition - What does Powder Coated mean?

Powder-coated surfaces feature a specialized type of finish coating that is thicker than paint. It is a durable finish that is long lasting and economical. Powder-coated surfaces are highly resistant to chipping, flaking, scratching, and wear. Even in full sun, the powder-coated surfaces remain vibrant and bright.

In the horticulture industry, much of the industrial equipment used in greenhouses and indoor gardens comes powder coated. The term comes up often in product descriptions. Things like fans, reflectors, grow light hoods, timers, monitors, and more often come with powder-coated casings that protect the product from not just wear and tear, but from water and high humidity, etc.

MaximumYield explains Powder Coated

Powder coating comes in a wide array of colors and finishes such as gloss, satin, high gloss, candies, clear, metallic, hammer tone, glitter, and iridescent. Textures range from smooth to wrinkled, rough, and pitted like an orange skin.

Powder coated surfaces are environmentally friendly. The powder coating process involves using finely ground particles of resin and pigment. The particles are then electrostatically sprayed onto a surface. The electrically charged particles cling to the surface. They are then heated and smoothed in a curing oven.

Unlike liquid finishes, powder coating contains no solvents such as volatile organic compound (VOCs), which can be harmful to the environment. In the United States, powder-coated surfaces account for 10 per cent of all industrial finish applications. Lawn furniture and garden tools are typically powder coated for durability.

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