Photosynthetic Response

Definition - What does Photosynthetic Response mean?

A plant’s photosynthetic response is the rate at which the plant utilizes sunlight to convert water and carbon dioxide into glucose.The glucose is then used as food energy for the plant to fuel its growth, bud formation, flowering, and seed production. Without adequate light, a plant cannot create a photosynthetic response to grow and complete its life cycle. It will ultimately wither and die.

A plant utilizes three distinct things to fulfill its photosynthetic response: the sun, water, and carbon dioxide (CO2). The plant will absorb water through the soil or through hydroponics. It passes from the plant’s root hairs up its stems and into its leaves.The plant's leaves also contain chlorophyll, which captures the sun's light. The pores on the plant's leaves (stomata) absorb sunlight and convert it into carbon dioxide.

MaximumYield explains Photosynthetic Response

Once the photosynthetic response starts, the plant uses its leaves and chlorophyll to convert the sunlight into carbon dioxide and then into glucose and other products needed to grow. On top of creating carbon dioxide, the plant also releases oxygen into the atmosphere during its entire photosynthetic response process.

For a plant to complete its photosynthetic response, it requires six molecular components of carbon dioxide. Those six molecules will combine with 12 molecules of water by relying on the energy of light. The process will culminate in the formation of one molecule of carbohydrate and six molecules of oxygen and water.

Factors such as temperature can influence a plant’s photosynthetic response. Each type of plant has its own optimal leaf temperature for ideal photosynthesis to occur. Often a temperature drop of 10 degrees Fahrenheit will slow a plant’s photosynthetic response.

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