Biodynamics

Definition - What does Biodynamics mean?

Biodynamics is very similar to organic farming. However, it relies heavily on esoteric concepts that were first thought up by Rudolph Steiner.

Biodynamics was initially created in 1924 and was really the first movement towards any form of organic farming ever implemented. The farming concepts of biodynamics focus on the use of manures as fertilizers. It also utilizes composts and combines the mystical elements of the cosmic realm with farming the Earth.

In biodynamics, a variety of herbal and mineral additives are used in natural fertilizers, such as the addition of ground quartz in a cow’s horn. The quartz is believed to help combine cosmic forces with the soil.

MaximumYield explains Biodynamics

Biodynamic gardening, sometimes referred to as biodynamic agriculture, focuses strongly on lunar and solar times and is often referred to as permaculture. Forms of biodynamic agriculture were used in 60 countries in 2016. Germany is one of the biggest users of biodynamic farming methods. The method is especially popular for growing grapes in a variety of vineyards.

Although concepts of biodynamics differ a bit around the world, some characteristics remain the same such as using raised beds to grow.

With biodynamics, the plants are spaced in raised beds further apart to allow ample room to reach the plant without walking on the soil and compacting it. Most beds are spaced at least five feet. The raised beds are also tilled to a depth of two feet. The deep tilling allows plants to form an ample root system.

The plants within the beds are also spaced so that when they grow their leaves touch and create a natural weed barrier. The ample foliage cover across the soil's surface also helps to regulate the soil’s temperature and protect the plants from dramatic temperature changes.

Plants are also grown in companion groups so that they each benefit from each other's presence by eliminating pests and improving flavor.

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