Staminate flower

Definition - What does Staminate flower mean?

In botany, a plant is described as a staminate flower if it only has stamens and lacks carpels. Though most plants have stamens and carpels, there are some unisex plants that only have either stamens or carpels. Staminate flowers are ones that only have stamens and are also known as androecious flowers.

MaximumYield explains Staminate flower

Unlike pistillate flowers are flowers with carpels or loosely categorized the female in plants, staminate flowers are flowers with only stamens or male characteristics in plants expressed. A staminate flower does not have an active female part. But, it is important to note that staminate flowers can be found in plants that bear the female flowers too.

Flowering plans are largely found on land and they need to go through pollination and fertilization for reproduction. Given that pollination requires carpels and stamens, staminate flowers undergo self-pollination when there is a pistillate flower in the same plant or in close proximity. Examples of staminate flowers include clusters of flowers in plants and little growths from stems in vegetables.

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