Fog Cooling

Definition - What does Fog Cooling mean?

Fog cooling refers to a method of greenhouse or grow room cooling in which a machine is used to create a fine mist and circulate it throughout the space.

A fog cooling system not only cools a greenhouse through the use of air circulation but also by producing a fine mist. As the fog’s water droplets warm and evaporate, they absorb heat and cool the air within the greenhouse.

MaximumYield explains Fog Cooling

Ideally, the fog droplets produced by a fog cooling system should be within a 4.5 to 10.4 MPa operation pressure range because fine droplets evaporate quickly into the air before they have the chance to fall onto foliage surfaces.

Excessive moisture on a plant’s foliage frequently leads to diseases, so when utilizing a fog cooling system the water droplet sizes are of paramount concern – if they are too small, they evaporate too quickly; if they are too large, they can affect plant health over time.

A fog cooling system relies on potable water to create the fog and prevent the system’s nozzles and other mechanisms from getting clogged.

If potable water is not readily available then many fog cooling systems must be operated with a reverse osmosis system to get the water needed to create a fine fog.A fog cooling system is a perfect way to control the temperature in greenhouses located in hot, arid climates. In such locations, a fog cooling system can drop the temperature inside of a greenhouse significantly compared to the outside temperature and makes year round growing a reality.

A fog cooling system also helps maintain an ideal humidity level inside the greenhouse. However, in locations of the world that are naturally hot and humid, a fog cooling system does not significantly cool the interior of the greenhouse so such a system is not generally used in humid regions.

Share this: