Foliage

Definition - What does Foliage mean?

In botany, the term foliage refers to either a collective canopy of leaves made up of many plants, or an individual tree or plant's grouping of leaves.

In other words, foliage is simply a grouping of leaves. Unlike the plant canopy, which is the upper top layer of a plant's foliage, the word foliage is used to represent the entire plant's leaves and leaf growth.

A plant grows the majority of its foliage during its vegetative stage.

MaximumYield explains Foliage

Foliage, which is the the aggregate of leaves of one or more plants, thrives best indoors, away from extreme weather conditions. For this reason, most foliage tends to grow the greatest in arid or tropical regions, where plants receive plenty of sunshine all year long.

To prevent a plant's foliage from yellowing, shedding, or drying, it is important to meet the plant’s specific environmental needs, such as proper exposure to the sun and regular watering. Likewise, a grower can often visually inspect their plant's foliage to gauge how healthy their plants are.

Plants such as annuals, perennials, shrubs, and evergreens sport light and airy foliage, some of which is multi-colored. Artemisias, for example, are known for their rich blue, orange, purple, and silvery-gray hues.

Plants that are propagated and sold solely for their ornamental leaves are known as foliage plants, otherwise called green plants. Many plants are considered foliage plants, especially ferns and money trees.

In some plants, their foliage changes according to the season, with most trees bearing gold and russet leaves during autumn. Most foliage tends to appear green over spring and summer. Many types of leaves don’t normally sustain frozen temperatures, which is why most trees don’t present any type of foliage during winter.

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